Lest They Be Forgotten Flag

Categories:Flags
Jim Bolinger

Lest They Be Forgotten is a flag that began with a father’s mission to honor his own fallen son! The flag was developed as a dedication to the fallen heroes of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The father’s mission resulted not only in the creation of the flag, but also the establishment of a foundation for the creation of hometown memorials to service members who have lost their lives in the war against terrorism. The purchase of this flag will help achieve the foundation’s goals to establish memorials in towns throughout the nation.

However, no other flag has ever been designed specifically for general public use as a tribute to service members killed-in-action. Therefore, Flags International suggests that this flag serve as the appropriate symbol to be flown each Memorial Day (for additional information on the history and traditions of Memorial Day, ask for Flags International free information sheet).

The symbolism and meaning of the Lest They Be Forgotten Flag is explained below:

  • The white background symbolizes the purity of their hearts & spirits
  • The black field cross memorial signifies the solemness of their dedication & devotion
  • The red lettering represents their valor & the blood they shed
  • The gold star is for their Gold Star families
  • The gold border embodies the enduring love & memories that only families and friends can share, and the memories that are more precious than gold.

Notes:

  1. The term “black field cross memorial” refers to the M-16 with helmet depicted in the flag. This is the traditional symbol of a fallen soldier or, perhaps, even a gravesite on a battlefield.
  2. “Gold Star families” is a reference to the “Gold Star Service Banner”. The immediate families of those service members that have been killed-in-action are authorized by the Department of Defense to display the “Gold Star Service Banner”. (Ask for Flags International information sheet on Service Star Banners.)

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